Have You Ever Wanted To Walk With A Lion In Africa?

Have you ever wanted to walk with lions?

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to just see one of these amazing creatures in it’s natural habitat?

If so, we have special offers to Antelope Park, a unique game reserve set in over 3000 acres of open savannah grasssland in Zimbabwe. Every trip benefits the African Lion and Environmental Research Trust (ALERT), a lion conservation and research group. ALERT is Africa’s first genuine program working to ethically re-introduce the offspring of captive-bred African lions back into the wild.

Set in over 3000 acres of open savannah grassland, Antelope Park is a unique game reserve and a haven of tranquillity set in the African bush, welcoming guests and volunteer eco-tourists alike to the charming and remarkable camp site. Walk with lions, ride through the wilderness on elephant or horseback, view the abundance of wildlife in the Park or canoe on the scenic lake. During the evening, Antelope Park’s exclusive Night Encounters offer a truly amazing, close up experience of lions hunting in their natural environment.

Our founder, James Cannon Boyce, just returned from a visit to Zimbabwe and had his own memorable experience walking with the lions.

The One Armed Gambler Who’s Betting On The African Lion

In 1986, I was a young American exchange student who had a chance to study at the University of Zimbabwe — it opened my eyes to the wonder of Africa. Right now, I am sitting in the middle of the country once again, staying at Antelope Park, near Gweru where my eyes have been opened once again by one’s man passion and persistence.

Andrew Conolly is a man who has stayed in his native Zimbabwe through good times and bad, and now has dedicated his life to try and help save the African lion — despite the fact that a lion took his left arm twenty years ago.

“Some people would give an arm and a leg to save the lion. I’m halfway there.”

There are two things I love in people I am fortunate enough to meet — passion and a complete lack of patience with people who just talk the talk and never get around to walking the walk.

Read more of this story on medium.com.

 

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Lions And Lions And Lions, Oh My. Happy #AfricaFactFriday

Just to be clear, as we don’t want any disappointed readers, there aren’t any tigers in Africa. Not a single one. Well, not a single one in the wild at least. There could be one or two in zoos we suppose but frankly, who wants to travel to Africa and go to a zoo? Not us.

It’s not that the tigers are all gone, there never were any tigers here. There aren’t really bears either – there might be a sub-species of a bear around somewhere but with all due respect to “The Wizard Of Oz” if you’re headed to Africa, it’s really all about the king of the plains, the pride of Africa – lions.

Lions are the second largest cat – right after the tiger which we just mentioned. Until as recently as 10,000 years ago, lions were the second most popular mammal on earth right after humans. Now, there are, of course, a lot more humans than lions but if you want to really see lions, we highly recommend The Naboisho Conservancy in Kenya. This incredible conservancy is not only over 55,000 acres but is home to the largest pride of lions in the Mara ecosystem. Some days, the pride can be seen in its entirety with over 100 lions gathered to hunt and sleep – really just to sleep – as lions sleep for over 20 hours every single day.

Within Naboisho, there are a number of wonderful camps but we’re partial to Encounter Mara – this amazing tented camp was recently voted the “Best Tented Safari Camp In Kenya.” If you have ever been to Kenya, or even just dreamed of Kenya, well then you know that there are a lot of amazing tented safari camps so to be voted the best there, well, that’s saying something. Encounter Mara has some great specials going right now by the way – they are here. 

There’s one other thing you can do with lions – actually there are a lot of other things you can do with lions. Our good friends at African Impact have a number of amazing volunteer opportunities for you to come work, play and walk with the lions.

The highlights?

Walking with the lions in Zimbabwe and getting them ready to be re-introduced to the wild

Tracking lions, and other big predators, in South Africa.

More lions. Different country – Zambia

So if you like lions, there’s a country and a project just for you – just as lions are the kings of Africa, African Impact is king of the lion projects. While you’re there, you’ll learn more about lions than anyone will know, like they are the only cat with a tasseled tail, or that out on the plains, the roar of a lion can be heard from five miles away.

For some people, that’s close enough. For others, they want to get closer. A lot closer. 

 

 

This Is Going To Be Big. Happy #AfricaFactFriday

Ladies and Gentlemen, meet the hippo – a massive animal that loves water which is where their name comes from – the ancient Greeks named them “river horses.” You might already know that a large male hippo can weigh well over three tons – but that’s just the start of some interesting things we’ve uncovered about hippos for today’s very special Africa Fact Friday.

Think you can outrun a 6,000 pound animal with tiny legs? Think again. Hippos, over short distances, can easily outrun a human and have been clocked at 20 miles an hour. This, and the fact that it is surprising that a hippo can run so fast, make the hippo one of the deadliest animals in Africa. Far more people die each year in hippo attacks than they do in elephant or lion attacks.

Hippo facts start early with the amazing. A baby hippo is born underwater and must swim to get its first breath. The average baby hippo is over four feet in length and weighs approximately one hundred pounds. They get big fast because hippos eat – a lot. They’ll often eat over one hundred pounds of vegetation during the day as they float around, let’s call that their lunch. For dinner, overnight, they will climb out of the water when it’s dark and eat another hundred and fifty pounds of grass.

Hippos are native to approximately 30 countries in Africa and our friends at African Impact run a lot of volunteer projects that you might want to check out if you are interested in seeing these really amazing creatures. But again, if you run into a hippo, don’t try and run away from the same hippo – see above.

Last week, we talked about how close chimpanzees are to humans so we are sure by now you are wondering – well what’s the hippo’s closest living relative? The answer is the whale.

If you were to run into a hippo and if you wanted to break the ice and have a chat, you could start by asking a hippo how they produce a natural sunscreen which is a very useful trait in Africa, and then when the conversation got going a bit, you could ask the question that we really want to know the answer to –

Mother hippos produce pink milk.

How the heck does that happen? Let us know what you find out.

Don’t forget – Travel On The Good can give you lots of great chances to see hippos – Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, South Africa – they all have a lot of hippos. We’re especially big on the hippos in Zambia just so you know.